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Posts in Family Law.
November 2, 2012

If you are considering adoption as a means to create or add to your family, you may be aware that the United States Internal Revenue Code allows for an Adoption Tax Credit of up to $12,170.00+ for “qualified adoption expenses” paid or incurred by adoptive parent taxpayers. Please keep in mind that the Code allows for a taxcredit (a dollar for dollar reduction of federal tax) and this is not a mere deduction against taxable income. This is by far the largest tax credit available to individual taxpayers. The Credit was made refundable by law for 2010 and 2011, but is not refundable in 2012- meaning only families with federal income tax liability will benefit from this Credit in 2012. Also of significance is that the Adoption Tax Credit is available per child. The Adoption Tax Credit not only encourages parents to adopt children in need, but it makes adoption affordable for many that would otherwise be unable to complete their families.

By Michael Colletta on August 14, 2012

Getting a knock on the door from a CPS caseworker or receiving a “notification letter” in the mail that you’ve been named as a subject in a report of suspected child abuse or maltreatment is a scary experience. Clients who find themselves in that situation usually have many questions: What is a CPS report? Can CPS take my children? What happens when a neglect petition is filed in Family Court? What are my rights?

February 27, 2012

In October, 2010, the provisions of Section 236 (B)(7)(d) of the Domestic Relations Law, were enacted, granting parties the right to seek a modification of the child support provisions contained in an Agreement as incorporated into an Order or Judgment upon a showing of :

By Kenneth Olena on February 20, 2012

A frequently asked question in cases of divorce is; what has to be divided with my spouse? The general rule is that property acquired after the ceremony and before the filing of a summons is marital property. The general exceptions are property from an inheritance, a gift from someone other than your spouse, or the result of a personal injury recovery.

December 16, 2011

Countless divorce clients approach me with the same concern: If I move out of the house, will it be considered abandonment? The answer is no! “Abandonment” is one of the most misunderstood concepts in divorce lingo. In New York State, you must have a reason to get a divorce, called a “ground” for divorce. Abandonment is one of seven grounds on which you can commence a divorce action. In order to file for a divorce on the ground of Abandonment, you must show that your spouse abandoned you for a period of one year or more. Moving out of the marital residence after a divorce action is commenced is not considered abandonment. Even if you did abandon your spouse for a year, it merely provides your spouse with a reason to commence a divorce action. It does not in and of itself affect the outcome of the divorce action.

December 12, 2011

Are you a prospective adoptive parent considering or proceeding with a domestic or private placement adoption? If you are, chances are that you have already experienced a number of conflicting emotions. The adoption process can prove to be one of the most exciting, rewarding and fulfilling experiences of your life, while at the same time evoking some fear and angst.

November 23, 2010

Buffalo, NY (WBEN) — Think your soon-to-be-ex-spouse’s divorce attorney can’t find what you’ve “hidden” in your Facebook account?

Think again.

May 12, 2009

Domestic violence is a far more prevalent problem than most people realize. By some estimates, as many as one in three women have been abused by an intimate partner. While domestic abuse occurs more commonly against women, men can be victimized as well.

December 15, 2008

Far more often than not, grandparents play a special role in the lives of their grandchildren. In recent years, many grandparents have become increasingly involved in their grandchildren’s lives, from seeing them on a regular basis to caring for them on a full time basis, if a parent is unable or unwilling to care for the child. Sometimes, however, situations develop where grandparents are denied the right to see their grandchildren. Historically, grandparents lacked any legal right to visit and to communicate with their grandchildren when such contact was forbidden by the parents. However, lawmakers have increasingly recognized the need to preserve the beneficial relationship between children and their grandparents, and as such, at least forty-eight states have enacted various statutes allowing grandparents the right to petition for visitation under certain circumstances. For instance, New York State, which takes a paternalistic approach, recognizes that visits with grandparents can be a precious part of a child’s life, providing benefits that cannot be derived from any other relationship.

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