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By Rebecca Kujawa on January 7, 2019

Throughout our lives, we obtain medical care for all different types of conditions, diseases, aches and pains. From time to time, many of us feel that we – or a loved one – were not treated properly by a hospital or doctor. Regardless of the medical concern being addressed, doctors are required to exercise a certain standard of care. The standard of care is the generally accepted method of care a doctor of the same specialty would use when treating a patient afflicted with the same condition. Medical malpractice occurs when a medical provider breaches, or violates, that standard of care and the patient is injured as a result.

By Paul Pochepan on December 18, 2018

Q: What is Bankruptcy?                     

A: Bankruptcy is a process whereby a debtor can eliminate a significant portion of their total debt while retaining most if not all of their property. It was designed as a debt relief option for people who are having severe financial difficulties. It’s an option for people needing a fresh start financially.

Q: Who can apply?

A: An individual, spouses together, or a corporation or other entity. There are many different types of bankruptcy.

By Brooke Barron on December 4, 2018

In 2018, it is easier than ever to seek legal services through websites such as Nolo.com, BuildaWill.com, and LegalZoom. Although these sites may seem like a cheaper alternative to hiring a lawyer, their pitfalls and shortcomings can result in expensive mistakes. These ‘do-it-yourself’ websites lack the expertise, skill, and comprehensive knowledge to handle most legal matters effectively.

By Pia Perfetto on November 7, 2018

According to the New York State Coalition on Elder Abuse, America’s elder population is growing exponentially.  In fact, adults who are 85 years and older are the fastest growing population segment in the United States.  As these numbers grow, more adults are placed in nursing care facilities.  The data show that as people live longer, vulnerability is amplified, creating a greater potential for mistreatment of our country’s oldest demographic.

By Danielle DeJoseph on November 1, 2018

No one likes to think about death or being alone; perhaps these innate fears are the reason many of us fail to plan for the inevitable. But plan you must. Couples especially should place estate and financial planning at the top of their lists of priorities, and here’s why:

By Ryan Johnsen on October 30, 2018

Earlier this year, Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York State legislative leaders entered into an agreement that changed the landscape of medical malpractice suits in New York State—Lavern’s Law.  This law, named after the late Lavern Wilkinson, extends the statute of limitations for an individual to sue a treating medical professional and/or medical facility for the misdiagnosis of cancer.

October 16, 2018

New York State has enacted a new law regarding sexual harassment in the workplace. Effective October 9, 2018, all NYS employers must adopt written sexual harassment prevention policies and implement annual anti-harassment training for employees. Every employer, regardless of size, must implement a policy that includes guidance and instructions for filing a complaint of sexual harassment or discrimination. The law applies to full-time, part-time, seasonal, and temporary employees.

By Diane Tiveron on October 8, 2018

This week, the city is offering a last chance for Buffalo property owners to make arrangements to pay their real property tax bills. On Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of this week at Erie County Courthouse, 25 Delaware Ave., city attorneys will be available from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to make settlement deals. Property owners who fall behind on city taxes, sewer rent, user fees or water bills for more than two years are in danger of having their houses and buildings put up for foreclosure sale.

October 2, 2018

In 2018, New York State put forth several proposals with the goal of reforming New York’s criminal justice system, including reshaping New York’s current bail and pretrial detention systems. New York’s laws governing bail date back to the 1970s, at which time they were considered among the best and most progressive in the nation, requiring judges to consider a defendant’s reputation, employment and financial resources, family ties and length of residence in the community, and previous criminal record.

By Danielle DeJoseph on September 19, 2018

In a child custody battle, the judge is primarily concerned with making decisions that are in the best interest of the child. The judge will ask several questions to determine whether sole or joint custody is appropriate, what the child’s living arrangements will be, what the parents’ access schedule will be, and how the parents will support their child financially. If the circumstances allow, the judge will try her best to ensure that the child will be able to maintain a relationship with both parents.

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