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Posts in Criminal Law.
By Allison Franz on October 2, 2018

In 2018, New York State put forth several proposals with the goal of reforming New York’s criminal justice system, including reshaping New York’s current bail and pretrial detention systems. New York’s laws governing bail date back to the 1970s, at which time they were considered among the best and most progressive in the nation, requiring judges to consider a defendant’s reputation, employment and financial resources, family ties and length of residence in the community, and previous criminal record.

January 15, 2018

Recently, both the House and the Senate have held multiple Congressional Hearings focused on solving the opioid crisis in the United States.  

By Steven Cohen on July 12, 2017

If you're interested in true crime podcasts or series such as Serial, Undisclosed and Making a Murderer, then you absolutely have to listen and learn about Lynn DeJac and the horrible circumstances surrounding the murder of her daughter, Crystallynn Girard, and how one HoganWillig attorney fought to bring her justice.


May 15, 2017

On April 10, 2017, Governor Cuomo signed into law "Raise the Age" legislation that was included as part of the State Budget. Keep reading to learn more...


By Steven Cohen on July 18, 2016

Diane Tiveron talks with Civil Litigation Chair Steven Cohen about what your rights are when stopped by the police. Listen here.

April 25, 2016

If you have driven on Buffalo’s I-190 in recent weeks, you probably are familiar with the Department of Health’s new billboard campaign to promote New York’s “Good Samaritan Law.”

July 9, 2014

As social media becomes an increasingly widespread method of communicating with friends and family, conducting business, and sharing news, it also appears more frequently within the context of the law.  For quite some time now, material from social media has been used as evidence in investigations and lawsuits alike.

By Natalie Cappellazzo on June 17, 2014

A divided Supreme Court ruled on Monday that the government can strictly enforce a ban on purchasing a firearm for someone else, even if the other individual is lawfully allowed to own a gun.  Regardless of whether or not the other person is entitled to have a gun, this type of transaction is known as a “straw purchase” and conflicts with the lawfulness of a gun sale.  Because a gun purchase requires personal information, photo identification, and a background check, buying a gun with the intention of selling it to another person is a misrepresentation of the identity of the actual gun owner.

January 3, 2014

HoganWillig has learned that the New York State Unified Court System and local courts have received inquiries regarding email notices to appear in court proceedings. 

By Kevin Mahoney on December 20, 2013

Using a hand held mobile device while driving (phone, text, email), the penalty for a first offense still involves a maximum fine of a $150 fine plus surcharges.  The point violation increases from three to five points for offenses committed on or after June 1, 2013.

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